Art and Design Courses

NOTE: Studio courses require a combination of scheduled class time and independent work that averages at least 12 hours a week.

University Seminar Courses (US)

202 Envisioning Sustainability: Contemporary Art and Environmental Science (4 credits) This course serves to explore the relationship between contemporary art and environmental science using sustainability (global interdependence) as a conceptual nucleus. The course is based on the lecture and lab structure. The 'lecture' will be the scientific analysis of data and information and the 'lab' will be the corresponding creative process (to include long and short-term experimental projects). The class does not unfold in a linear fashion; rather the scientific content forms a framework for the artistic work. The studio art component serves as a lens through which to view issues of sustainability. Public exhibitions of the work developed throughout the course serve to link art and science and visually represent the scientific data and other findings of the course content. Consider the saying 'think globally act locally': The scientific analysis component is the GLOBAL and the experiential creative work (i.e. the collection of personal data and material) is the LOCAL. Students make a tangible connection between local choices and their corresponding global effects. NOTE: US202 can count as an Art & Design studio elective. 

Art Education Courses (AE)

300 The Uses of Theory in Art Education (4 credits; Spring) This course is an examination of the philosophy, psychology and literature of art education as the basis for developing and evaluating art curriculum and instruction. It offers appropriate field experience to apply theory to practical problems of teaching. It provides opportunity to examine and design instructional material and methods. Offered in even years. Prerequisites: ED 210, ED 212; or permission of the instructor.

308 Curriculum Design in Art Education (4 credits; Fall) This course examines stages of development and how artistic learning occurs. Students study curriculum theory, construct models for actual teaching situations, and develop strategies for classroom management and evaluation procedures. Appropriate field experience is provided. Prerequisites: AE 300, senior standing and admission to internship.

419 Undergraduate Student Teaching Practicum, Art Education, K-12 (12 credits; Fall, Spring) The student teaching practicum is to include 14 weeks of full-time teaching in an accredited school and attendance at nine on-campus seminars. It includes supervision by an Arcadia University faculty member. Students must provide transportation to the school. Applications are due at the beginning of the semester prior to student teaching. Deadline dates are Oct. 1 for the Spring semester and Feb. 1 for the Fall semester. Prerequisites: AE 300, 308, and senior standing.

Art History Courses (AH)

111 Renaissance to Modern Art (4 credits, day; Fall) This course is a chronological survey of art from the Renaissance to the Modern world, spanning a period from 1300 to the 20th century. Selected works in architecture, sculpture and painting are studied as examples of the way in which the natural and social environment, together with ethical and religious beliefs, determine the forms and images of a culture’s art.

112 Egyptian to Medieval Art (4 credits, day; Spring) This course is a chronological survey of art from ancient Egypt to the medieval period, spanning a period from 3000 BCE to 1300 CE. Selected works in architecture, sculpture and painting are studied as examples of the way in which the natural and social environment, together with ethical and religious beliefs, determine the forms and images of a culture’s art.

221 History of Modern Architecture (4 credits; Fall) The course is intended as an introduction to and a thorough study of the architecture of the 19th and 20th centuries. Beginning with an overview of the 18th century, the course traces architecture’s evolution through the present day, including postmodernism. Study is visually intensive with slides shown during class and a walking tour of Philadelphia architecture. Required for all students with Interior Design concentration. Offered in even years.

222 Renaissance Art (4 credits; Spring) This course explores Renaissance art in Western Europe from the 14th to 16th centuries, with a, focus on the revival of the classical past, changes in artistic status, gender roles, and the advent of the Protestant Reformation. Artists may include Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, and Michelangelo. Fieldtrips to the Philadelphia Museum of Art to study the Renaissance collections are included. Offered in even years.

224 Baroque Art (4 credits; Spring) This course focuses on art and architecture of the 17th century in the European artistic centers of Rome, Paris, Madrid, and Amsterdam. Themes include the impact of the Counter Reformation, relationships between art and power, and the development of portraiture, genre and landscape painting. Artists may include Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velázquez, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Fieldtrips to the Philadelphia Museum of Art to study the Baroque collection are included. Offered in odd years.

225 19th Century Art (4 credits; Fall) This survey of Rococo, Neo-Classicism, the Romantic and Realist revolt, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism focuses on the relationship of art to the breakup of fixed values, the rise in influence of the middle class, new concepts of philosophy and religion, and increased individualism. It considers the new role in society for the artist manifest in the stylistic changes of the century.

226 History of Photography (4 credits; Fall) This course examines the invention and evolution of the medium of photography from the camera obscura through technical, social, and aesthetic evolutions to the present day. This investigation includes a chronological exploration of broad purposes and genres that have been employed by major photographers. Discussions include critical analysis of both photographs and aesthetic movements in photography. Study includes visits to local exhibitions and museums. Prerequisites: AH 111, AH 112, FA 102, or FA 103.

227 History of Modern Craft and Design: 1915-Present (4 credits) This class explores the movements and styles that developed during the 20th centuries in American and European decorative arts, craft and design. Some of these are Bauhaus, Art Deco, Streamline, International Style, and Contemporary Craft. The social, political and artistic causes as well as the innovators and practitioners of these styles are studied as well. The impact of technological developments and social change on the art are studied. Prerequisites: AH 111 or AH 112 are recommended.

323 Contemporary Curatorial Practices (4 credits) This seminar provides students with a broad
 overview of mid-to-late 20th century and contemporary art through the lens of exhibition making. Organized around a comprehensive proposal for a thematic group exhibition, topics include evolution of gallery and exhibition contexts, installation design, the rhetorical impact of artworks on each other, the role of
the given physical site and layout on the works displayed, and the exhibition as mode of interpretation and research. Students are introduced to a wide variety of contemporary artists and how their work is contextualized by the exhibition format. Projects include an oral presentation on a postwar artist (or movement), curating a hypothetical group exhibition, and six 2-to-3-page papers. Fieldtrips to regional exhibition spaces and guest speakers reinforce the course material.

326 Seminar: 1900 to 1950 (4 credits; Fall) This advanced seminar on Fauvism, Cubism, Dadaism, Futurism, Surrealism, Expressionism and other movements of the first half of the century focuses on their developments in the ’40s and ’50s in Europe and America. It requires individual research and discussion on a selected period. Prerequisites: AH 111 or AH 112 and one of the following: AH 222, 224 or 225. Open to juniors and seniors.

328 Seminar: Contemporary Art (4 credits; Spring) This advanced seminar on current art and its background in the ‘60s and ‘70s includes methods and problems in modern art criticism. It requires papers on various concepts for discussion and critiques of art shows in Philadelphia and New York. Prerequisites: AH 111 or AH 112 and one of the following: AH 222, 224 or 225. Open to juniors and seniors.

385, 386 Studies in the History of Art (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is special studies in the history of art. It requires an individual project under the guidance of one instructor. Possibilities include an in-depth study of an artist or works from a Philadelphia museum. Prerequisite: Permission of the Chair and instructor. 387 Special Topics in History of Art Museums (4 credits; Spring, alternate years) This course is intended for students who want to learn the fundamentals about museums, their history and changing philosophies, and the economic, social and political context within which they exist. Fieldtrips are to a variety of museums (anthropology, art, natural history and science).

490 Senior Thesis (4 credits; Spring) Students complete a semi-independent study in a problem of art history chosen in consultation with the faculty adviser and thesis committee. It includes individual and group conferences to examine research methods and procedures. Required of all Art History majors.

Art Therapy Courses (AT)

200 Introduction to Art Therapy (4 credits; Fall) This basic survey of the history of art therapy includes a review of contemporary theory and practice. 210 Intermediate Art Therapy (4 credits; Spring) This course is an introduction to theoretical models of psychology most commonly utilized within the practice of art therapy. Psychodynamic, Cognitive/Behavioral, Self-Psychology, Jungian and Gestalt perspectives are integrated with art therapy techniques and practice. Developmental theories of Freud, Piaget, Mahler and Erickson are correlated with art processes and art productions. It includes class discussions, readings, experiential and exams. Prerequisite: AT 200

310 Art Therapy: Applications and Techniques (4 credits; Fall) This studio and didactic course fosters empathic responsiveness and increased awareness through exploration of a wide variety of media choices and applications within an experiential framework. Students work individually and in group settings to develop and integrate approaches to the use of art therapy media applications. Prerequisites: AT 200, AT 210, FA 103, FA 102 and at least two additional Art and Design courses, PY 111 and two of the following: PY 212, ED 214, PY 238.

365 Internship in Art Therapy (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is an opportunity to get firsthand experience in the field of art therapy by working as a volunteer in an agency or hospital. It requires 100 hours for 2 credits, 200 hours for 4 credits. A maximum of 8 credits permitted. Prerequisites: AT 200 and AT 210, junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor and Chair.

Fine Arts Courses (FA)

102 Studio Art Foundations I (3 credits; Fall) Studio Art Foundations is a course that consists of a studio and a weekly lecture component. The studio component meets twice a week for four hours and will covers thematic ideas of Identity, Language and Environment. Students will be exposed to a variety of materials, processes and ways of working. They will also be exposed to art historical examples pertaining to the theme they are exploring. Through this, students will eventually gain knowledge of both hands-on and conceptual skills relating to making art in the world today. Successful students will analyze the material offered to them and synthesize the information into their own work and evaluate their work in comparison to their peers. The lecture covers a variety of topics applicable to what students are learning about in the studio component of this course. Lecture time will be used for community based discussions and interactions. There will also be in-class group projects, film screenings, group critiques and student presentations.  The course meets for 6 studio and lecture hours weekly, with at least as many hours of independent work outside of class. This course is required for art majors but may be taken by non-art majors interested in art. This course counts as a Visual Literacy designation in the Arcadia University Curriculum.

103 Studio Art Foundations II (3 credits; Spring) FA 103 has the same course structure as FA 102 with different course content. The thematic ideas covered in the Spring semester are Desire, Ritual and Technology. This course can be taken as a continuation of 102 or may be taken as a stand-alone class. This course counts as a Visual Literacy designation in the Arcadia University Curriculum.

104 Drawing I (3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course includes a wide range of experiences that focus on developing the student’s ability to perceive space, light and form and to express them two-dimensionally. Drawing I places particular emphasis on line. The course is designed to give students a thorough grounding in the conceptual, formal and expressive nature of drawing, along with attention to process. Six studio hours weekly and independent work.

105 Drawing II (3 credits; Fall, Spring) Building on the language developed in Drawing I, this course focuses on space, light and form as expressed primarily through tone. Both perceptual and conceptual applications are explored, and a range of media is used. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: Open to students with no previous art course, although FA 103 or 104 is recommended.

200 Painting I (3 credits; Fall) An introduction to the inherent qualities of the medium, this course examines the formal qualities of color, light, space, form, composition and point of view, and the role they play in expressive intent. The course emphasizes developing perceptual vision. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 104 and 105

201 Color and Design (4 credits; Fall) This studio course is designed to help the student to better understand the behavior and the power of color and to consider the diverse applications of this understanding. Study includes the properties of color—chroma, value, intensity, hue and temperature—as well as study of the interaction of colors and the underlying principles that govern their behavior. Theoretical understanding is applied to exercises as well as more formally executed designs. Prerequisite: FA 103.

203 Printmaking I (3 credits; Fall) This course is a comprehensive introduction to the basic printmaking disciplines (intaglio, relief) through traditional and contemporary techniques. It emphasizes the creative process, experimentation and exploration to encourage the development of style and image. It includes lectures on print history, group and individual critiques, and fieldtrips to the Philadelphia Print Club and area galleries. It requires an additional studio fee. Six hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 103 or 104.

204 Ceramics I (3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course introduces and develops fundamental skills employed in the ceramic hand-building process, including coil, pinch, slab building, and more. The focus of this class is on the development of skills of craftsmanship and construction as well as other formal and technical aspects of making ceramic art. Students develop the skills needed to transform abstract ideas into tangible objects and build a vocabulary to facilitate informed discussion of ceramic art. The course includes visual presentations that focus on historical and contemporary ceramics. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 103 or 104. FA 102 is recommended. Non-art majors do not need FA 103 or 104.

205 Metals and Jewelry I (3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is an introduction to the basic processes of metal working as they relate to making jewelry, objects of use such as vases and boxes, and small three-dimensional designs. It encourages exploration of a wide range of projects to discover areas of special interest for creative development. It includes soldering, bending, casting and stone-setting techniques. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 103 or 104. FA 102 is recommended.

206 Introduction to Graphic Design (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is an introduction to techniques and process associated with the graphic design industry. Students develop traditional hand techniques as well as computer skills, including the use of Adobe Illustrator, InDesign and Photoshop to form the necessary technical skills needed in the production process. This course is intended to provide a firm base of technical skill that may be augmented later through the development of applied theoretical interests. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 103 or 104 and recommended FA 270.

208 Photography I (3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is an introduction to the medium of photography covering the materials, processes, history and aesthetics of black and white photography. It emphasizes the essentials of 35mm camera operation, meter reading, film processing, paper development and portfolio preparation. It introduces the photographic image as a means of personal expression through the use of the camera, light sensitive material, technical expertise and mind’s eye. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level photography courses.

209 Photojournalism (4 credits; offered at varying intervals) This course is an exploration of the aesthetics and the methodology of photojournalism as an expressive and persuasive form of communication. Concentration is on the building of a coherent set of images revealing the photographer’s stance toward the world, whether political, psychological or aesthetic. It includes assignments in black and white (film), color negative film with digital output, digital capture, portfolio reviews, slide presentations and readings. It develops the aesthetic and practical skills needed to prepare for, approach and complete a documentary project. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 208

210 Painting II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Studio work emphasizes continued development of perceptual vision. Subjects include still life, landscape and the figure. Emphasis is placed on individual solutions to problems posed by the instructor or developed by the student. Three critique and lecture hours weekly plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 200.

211 Painting III (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course emphasizes the further understanding of theoretical aspects of painting. Students explore in theory and in practice different attitudes in painting, which include abstraction, as well as idea, concept and thematic approaches. This course is the bridge that is designed to help students to make the transition to a more personal and individual way of working. Three critique and lecture hours weekly plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 210. 213 Figure Painting (4 credits) The course is designed to introduce students to the practice of Figure Painting. Students work strictly from observation of the live model. Emphasis is placed on working quickly and with authority as a means to encourage risk taking and experimentation as a path to quality. Students work from the premise of "vague to vivid." Prerequisites: FA 304 and FA 200.

220 Printmaking II (Screen Printing) (4 credits; Spring) This course is an exploration of screen processes—tusche, cut film and photographic—and other printmaking techniques. It provides a historical focus for 20th century printmaking. It emphasizes the development of style and image in the context of the screen medium. It encourages the manipulation of color formally and expressively. Ii includes fieldtrips to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Print Club and area galleries. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 103; or permission of the instructor.

222 Printmaking III (New Forms) (4 credits; Spring) This course is an exploration of innovative and multifaceted directions in printmaking, combining print media with other creative forms. It presents a wide range of methods and processes for exploration, including papermaking and casting, three-dimensional and constructed prints, color Xerox, multi-plate collagraph and monoprint. It combines extensive review of contemporary directions with trips to the Print Club, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and area galleries. Six critique and studio hours weekly plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 102 or 103; or permission of the instructor.

226 Illustration I (4 credits; Spring) An introduction to art in a commercial context, this course explores various techniques and materials used historically by applied artists as well as by contemporary illustrators. The development of concepts and design through the use of both black and white and color is emphasized. Six critique and studio hours weekly plus independent work. Offered in odd years. Prerequisites: FA 103, FA 104, and FA 105.

228 Children’s Book Illustration (4 credits; Spring) Combining academic and studio elements, this course encourages students to focus on the processes through which children’s books are created, including examining age-group characteristics, generating ideas and developing style. The history of children’s books and their illustrations are analyzed. Studio and/or written assignments involve following an illustrated book from concept to publication. Classroom activities are supplemented by fieldtrips and presentation by guest artists. Offered in even years. Prerequisites: FA 103, 104, and 105.

229 The Artist and the Exhibition: Gallery Practicum (4 credits) Distinct from the creation of works of art, the logistics of presenting art—from proper construction techniques to the safe conveyance and handling of work and final presentation in an exhibition space—present their own inherit challenges and opportunities for creative problem solving. In this class, students experience these challenges firsthand by mounting actual shows. Utilizing the two recently inaugurated student exhibition spaces, the Judith Taylor Student Gallery in Landman Library, and the Turret Project Space in Murphy Hall, students receive instruction in a workshop format on the construction, preparation, transportation, and exhibition of various two-dimensional and three-dimensional artworks. Additionally, students investigate, through class trips, readings and discussions, the transformation of the meaning and theoretical constructs that have surrounded the exhibition space throughout history to understand how these concepts can affect the meaning of work within a gallery and the choices made in how it is displayed. Prerequisites: FA 102, FA 103, at least one 100- or 200-level studio art course.

230 Ceramics II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course explores a wide variety of clays, glazes, firing processes, and construction techniques, including mold making and wheel throwing. It incorporates the exploration and formulation of glaze for use in a variety of kiln environments including low-fire, high-fire, and salt glazing. Clay bodies include earthenware, stoneware, porcelain, and others. The course emphasizes research into historical ceramics. It includes visual presentations that focus on historical and contemporary ceramics. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 204.

231 Ceramics III (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of FA 230. This course is designed to foster greater independence and further develop a personal approach to the medium. Assignments are devised to allow for the greatest possible variation in interpretation. Through readings dealing with contemporary art and ceramics art criticism, the course emphasizes the development of a contextual base for the creative process. It includes visual presentations that focus on contemporary ceramics, sculpture, and installation. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 230.

240 Metals and Jewelry II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Development of the creative use of metals through advanced techniques in the production of jewelry, singly and in quantity, this course emphasizes enrichment of aesthetic possibilities. It includes methods of surface embellishment and combination of materials. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 205.

241 Metals and Jewelry III (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of FA 240. This course provides opportunity for semi-independent work on metals and jewelry projects of special interest. It covers experience in shop management, production techniques, and business and market practices. It includes portfolio preparation. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 240.

250 Graphic Design I (Typography) (4 credits; Spring) An introduction to typography and typographic principles through applied and experimental projects, this course is a wide-ranging exploration of type and communication intended to provide an historical, sociopolitical and aesthetic base for the practice of typography and further studies in graphic design. Prerequisite: FA 206 and FA 270, or permission of the instructor.

251 Graphic Design II (Interactive Design) (4 credits; Fall) An introduction into Web-based and interactive design, the course focuses on communication skills by exploring the various modes and techniques of interactive media such as web sites, interface design, and tablet and portable device interfaces. Software and languages include Adobe Dreamweaver, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and jQuery. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 206, FA250 and FA 270 or permission of instructor.

260 Interior I (Planning and Presentation) (4 credits; Spring) Beginning with a residential design problem, study the ways to approach, evaluate, analyze and synthesize information to solve a given design problem. This course emphasizes the development of solutions within the framework of plans, elevations, sections and models. It introduces graphic techniques and includes field trips to design resource centers. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisites: FA 263 and FA 265

261 Interior II (Materials and Methods) (4 credits; Fall) Continuation of FA 260. This course studies the properties and application of building materials and finishes in relation to interior space, together with interpretations of architectural drawings. It emphasizes the manipulation of space and form. It introduces commercial office space planning, as well as hospitality design. Professionals in the field are invited to lecture as well as jury final presentations. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 260 and FA 262.

262 Digital Drawing for Interior Design (4 credits; Spring) This course is an exploration of the latest technology in computer-aided design and drafting specifically for the fields of interior design and architecture. The course covers fundamental skills necessary to create computer-generated drawings using 2 and 3Dl software packages. This course works in tandem with FA 260. Prerequisite: FA 263 or equivalent interior design or digital drawing experience.

263 Interior Design Principles and Practices (4 credits; Fall) This course is an introduction to the Interior Design discipline, with emphasis on understanding professional terminology and design techniques. It provides an introduction to design concepts development and model construction in order to study 3-dimensional space. Field trip to professional design showrooms. Prerequisites: FA 102, 103, 104, 105.

265 Graphic Presentation for Interior Design (4 credits; Fall) This course emphasizes exploratory design drawing as a means of creating new ideas and more detailed rendering in order to improve skills in perspective, drafting and presentation techniques of interior designs. It focuses on effective presentations in a variety of media in both monotone and color. Prerequisites: FA 102, 103, 104, 105 or permission of the adviser.

270 Digital Imaging I (4 credits; Fall, Spring) An introductory course in the use of Macintosh graphic workstations, this course emphasizes the new aesthetic of computer graphics and its potential for expanding creativity and enhancing creative concepts. Applications in Art and Design and illustration are explored through the systems comprehensive color, drawings, layout and input/output capabilities; including flatbed and slide scanners, graphics, tablets, and CD-Rom production. Comprehensive experience in MAC OS, hardware and software components. Prerequisite: FA 103 or 104. Non-art majors require permission of instructor.

271 Digital Imaging II (4 credits; Fall) Digital Imaging II is an in-depth exploration of Fine Art Digital Printmaking. The class encourages personal investigation, use of hybrid techniques and non-traditional printing surfaces. It approaches digital media art making through a focus on visual ideas and concepts and understanding of contemporary digital technologies as artistic media through the creative completion of specific assignments. Prerequisite: FA 270.

280 Photography II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course covers intermediate camera and darkroom techniques and controls. It introduces advanced exposure and metering systems, professional darkroom controls, archival processing systems and various format cameras. It integrates the development of personal work with an examination of historical precedents and contemporary thought. It emphasizes the relation of processes and techniques to expressive purpose. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 208; or permission of the instructor.

291 Sculpture I (4 credits) Students will identify, examine and implement contemporary methods and processes of sculpture. This course explores sculpture (all 3d forms) as a mode of communication. Students further develop their artistic voice by creating at least five major works in the semester. The course content is communicated in a variety of ways through material demonstrations, slide lectures and discussions. This course is about experimenting with materials and learning hands-on skills. Students spend time experimenting with new processes and developing works. This course counts as a Visual Literacy designation in the Arcadia University Curriculum.

300 Advanced Drawing (4 credits; Spring) What is Drawing as a medium when not intended to represent the appearance of the world? This course introduces students to contemporary issue in drawing, building a bridge from work done in Drawing I and II. Figure/Ground, mark making, mapping, erasure, fragment, illusion/non-illusion, memory, as well as the use of non-traditional materials are topics for exploration. Studio work is supported by slides lectures, discussions and critiques. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisites: FA 104, 105, 200, or 203; or permission of the instructor.

304 Figure Drawing (4 credits; Fall) This advanced course in drawing from the figure is directed toward a clearer perceptual understanding of the human form. It emphasizes surface anatomy and the figure in art. Prerequisites: FA 104, 105, AH 111 or AH 112.

306 Figure Drawing (2 credits; Fall) This course is a 2-credit version of FA 304 designed to provide students with supplemental study of the human figure. See description under FA 304.

310 Painting IV (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Students develop and explore individual problems in painting, working toward the development of a more personal means of expression. Six studio hours weekly plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 211 or permission of the adviser.

311 Painting V (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This course is independent work in painting with increased individual responsibility. The students work to bring focus and clarity to their ideas and through that distillation bring greater intensity to the work. Six studio and critique hours weekly plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 211; or permission of the adviser.

318 Printmaking IV (4 credits; Fall) This course investigates advanced printmaking processes and techniques, including multi-plate, viscosity color printing, photo-etching, color posterization, stone and plate lithography. The course emphasizes the expansion of printmaking images to achieve a strong creative and individual direction, and it encourages the aesthetic considerations of form and expression. It provides historical investigation of print as the means for expressing attitudes toward the world. Marketing and business practices are introduced, as well as techniques for operating a print studio. Three critique and lecture hours weekly plus intensive independent work. Prerequisites: FA 203 and junior standing.

332 Ceramics IV (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of FA 231. This course provides students with an opportunity to execute advanced projects in ceramics, encourages greater self-determination, and prepares students for independent study in ceramics. The course further develops students’ abilities to be self-directed in their artistic pursuits. It includes individual and group critiques and specific readings related to students’ personal interests and goals. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisites: FA 231.

342 Metals and Jewelry IV (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of FA 241. This course provides an opportunity for advanced projects in metals and jewelry. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisites: FA 241 and permission of the adviser.

350 Graphic Design III (Branding and Identity Systems)(4 credits; Spring) This course is an introduction to and exploration of branding and logo systems in Graphic Design. How are questions of identity explored visually and conceptually? What characteristics should be conveyed versus aspired to? A semester long exploration of the logo in its various forms. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisites: FA 250 and FA 251, or permission from the instructor.

351 Graphic Design IV (Advanced Design in Visual Communication) (4 credits; Fall) Within this course, students utilize their skilled learned in the preceding semesters and develop more advanced projects in publication, packaging, and brand identity. Coursework revolves around presentations and problems designed to develop a design portfolio and prepare them for the real world. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 350 or permission of the adviser.

360 Interior Design III (Intermediate) (4 credits; Spring) Continuation of FA 261. This course examines the development of interior spaces from a given single area to designing a series of interrelated spaces. It emphasizes interior construction and detailing of custom designs. It includes the development of details, the construction of scale models for three-dimensional study as well as for presentation and the fine-tuning of drawing skills. Field trips allow students to view interior architectural installations. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 261 or permission of the adviser. Juniors and seniors only.

361 Interior Design IV (Advanced) (4 credits; Fall) Continuation of FA 360. This course presents advanced problems in interior design with concentration on space planning as related to complex interior architectural problems. It focuses on the principles of lighting design and environmental concerns, as related to interiors. Guest critics supplement course study. Six studio hours weekly and independent work. Prerequisite: FA 360 or permission of the adviser. Seniors only.

362 Advanced CAD for Interior Design (4 credits; Spring) Expanding upon a basic understanding of CAD, this course explores advanced computer aided design techniques for interior designers. The course is focused on three main areas of study: Photorealistic rendering, advanced 3D modeling, and animation. Issues involving design, visualization and presentation are investigated during each of these areas of study. Prerequisite: FA262

370 Digital and Color Photography (4 credits) An advanced studio course in the mediums of photography and digital imaging, this course introduces color photography via both digital and traditional cameras as well as other methods of image acquisition and digital photographic printmaking. It emphasizes individual work and criticism. Art making is at the core of this class, which focuses on technical requirements and contemporary practice relevant to individual work. Studio work is supported with lectures, discussion, readings, and critiques. Prerequisites: FA 280 (Photography 2) and FA 270 (Digital Imaging) are recommended.

381 Photography III (4 credits Continuation of FA 280. This course integrates the examination of stylistic trends and contemporary ideas with the development of a more individualized method of working. The development of a more personal imagery along with a broader base of technical as well as conceptual expertise is explored with increased individual responsibility. Studio work is supported with lectures, demonstrations, discussion, readings and critiques. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 280 or permission of the instructor with portfolio review.

382 Photography IV (4 credits) Continuation of FA 381. This course emphasizes individual work and criticism in preparation for production of thesis work. It focuses on technical requirements, historical precedents and contemporary practice and creative growth relevant to students’ selected areas of investigation. It includes lectures, discussion, critiques and readings. Six critique, lecture and studio hours weekly, plus independent work. Prerequisite: FA 381.

383 Senior Studio (2 credits) Senior studio focuses on both studio and academic aspects of the senior thesis, helping to prepare students for the practicalities of art making and paper writing. It includes discussions of professional practices associated with specific art concentrations and research related to the thesis paper. Primarily for B.F.A. students, Senior Studio is one of three components of the Art & Design Capstone experience. The other two are Senior Seminar (FA 484) and Senior Thesis (FA 490).

385, 386 Special Studies in Art (2, 3 or 4 credits; Fall, Spring) Special studies in art involving a project are carried through under the guidance of one instructor. Possible projects include continuing experience in three-dimensional design, representational drawing, or other studio area. Interior or graphic design majors might arrange for a workshop experience in their field. Prerequisite: Permission of the Chair, major adviser and special studies coordinator.

387 Internship (2 or 4 credits; Fall, Spring) An internship is working experience in the major studio area. Possibilities include placements with interior design and graphic design firms or with individuals involved in jewelry making, etc. It is the student’s responsibility to arrange for the internship and faculty support. The internship requires 100 hours for 2 credits, 200 hours for 4 credits. A maximum of 8 credit hours permitted. Prerequisites: Permission of the major adviser and internship coordinator.

484 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (3 credits; Fall) This advanced seminar is designed to enrich the senior thesis experience by offering a dialogue grounded in theory, research and practice. It allows the student time for thorough investigation of his or her concentration before embarking on the preparation of a major body of work for exhibition. It includes writing the research component of the senior thesis paper. One and a half seminar hours weekly plus independent research. Prerequisite: Senior status.

484 Senior Seminar (3 credits; fall) Senior Seminar is a class taught only in the fall semester and should be taken by students intending to complete their culminating thesis project in the spring of the same academic year. The course is made up of three thematic workshops exploring professional practices, presentation skills and philosophical approaches in the creative fields. Students will rotate through each area (and 3 different professors). This course meets once a week for an hour and a half.

490 Senior Thesis (4 credits; Spring) The seniors thesis is supervised preparation of a culminating visual work or set of works in the major studio area for criticism and exhibition. It includes individual and group conferences to examine advanced aspects of the major studio area. It requires a written thesis and is required of all B.F.A. and B.A. seniors.

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