Chemistry & Physics Course Descriptions

Chemistry Courses (CH)

100 Language of Science (2 credits; Fall) This course covers basic quantitative methods for introductory science courses. Includes dimensional and unit analysis in the SI and US customary systems, elementary propagation of error analysis, problem solving with simultaneous equations, scientific notation, graphical analysis, and transcendental analysis. Prerequisite: Placement in MA 110, a passing grade in MA 100 or permission of the instructor to take it concurrently with MA 100.

101 General Chemistry I (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Introduction to the principles of atomic structure, chemical bonding, states of matter, stereochemistry and their relation to the properties of selected inorganic and organic substances. Presents the historical development, methodology and philosophy of current understanding of transformations of matter and energy from an experimental viewpoint. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: CH 100 or placement exam.

102 General Chemistry II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of CH 101. Introduces the principles of chemical energetics, chemical equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry and radiation chemistry. Applies chemical principles to the reaction of inorganic and organic substances from a quantitative experimental point of view. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: CH 101. CH111 can be used as a prerequisite with permission of the chair.

111 Conceptual Chemistry I (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Introduction to the principles of atomic structures, chemical bonding, states of matter, stereochemistry and their relations to the properties of selected inorganic and organic substances, with a greater emphasis on modern quantum theory concepts. Develops the methodology and philosophy of current understanding of transformations of matter and energy from an experimental point of view. The course is especially designed for chemistry majors with an emphasis on quantitative analysis using college level mathematics, including elementary calculus concepts. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Calculus is not a prerequisite.

112 Conceptual Chemistry II (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Continuation of CH111. Introduces the principles of chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, reaction mechanisms, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry and radiation chemistry. Applies chemical principles to the reaction of selected inorganic and organic substances from a quantitative experimental point of view. The course is especially designed for chemistry majors with an emphasis on quantitative analysis using college level mathematics, including elementary calculus concepts. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Calculus is not a prerequisite. Prerequisites: CH111. CH101 can be used as prerequisite with permission of the chair. 

201 Organic Chemistry I: Structure, Mechanisms and Reactions (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This is a study of the correlation of acid-base theory, reaction mechanisms, molecular structure, chemical energetics, stereochemistry, and spectroscopy of organic functional groups, specifically alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alky halides, alcohols and ethers. Laboratory work stresses the synthesis, separation, identification and analysis of selected organic compounds using both micro- and macro-scale techniques. 1H NMR spectra are routinely acquired. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: CH102; or permission of the Department Chair.

202 Organic Chemistry II: Structures, Mechanisms and Reactions (4 credits; Fall, Spring) This continuation of CH 201, specifically organometallic compounds, conjugated systems, aromatics, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid derivatives, amines and carbohydrates, and spectroscopy laboratory work stresses the synthesis, separation, identification and analysis of selected organic compounds using both micro- and macro-scale techniques. 1H NMR spectra are routinely acquired Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: CH 201; or permission of the Department Chair.

203 Equilibrium and Analysis (4 credits; Spring) Examination of the principles and theory of chemical equilibrium in the context of quantitative chemical analysis. Includes selected traditional analytical laboratory techniques frequently applied to analyses of systems of biological and environmental interest. Also introduces instrumental techniques of analysis. Prerequisite: CH 102; or permission of the Chair.

290 Junior Seminar (3 credits; Spring) One semester course in preparation for research and the Senior Capstone experience. The course involves career guidance, examination of primary literature (journal articles), database searches, development of research writing skills, a library research paper; and oral presentation selection of a mentor and laboratory-based project for undergraduate research and Senior Capstone requirement. Prerequisites: CH202 and CH203.

301 Physical Chemistry I (4 credits; Fall) Study of the limitations of the degree of completion of chemical reactions and physical processes by natural law. Examines the gaseous state, liquid state, solid-state, thermodynamics, homogeneous chemical equilibria and phase equilibria from both experimental and conceptual viewpoints. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: CH 203, PH 202 or 212, MA 202.

302 Physical Chemistry II (4 credits; Spring) Continuation of CH 301. Considers the limitations on the rate of change by natural law. Explores the concepts of solutions, heterogeneous equilibria, electrochemistry, chemistry kinetics, quantum mechanics and surface phenomena. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: CH 301.

303 Biochemistry (4 credits; Fall) Study of the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones, along with selected topics in comparative biochemistry, cytochemistry and chemical genetics. Laboratory work emphasizes independent study and methods of biochemical research. Three class hours and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: CH 202.

304 Instrumental Methods of Analysis I (4 credits; Fall) Study of the theory and practice of instrumental analysis. Includes spectrophotometric, chromatographic and mass spectral methods as background for the separation, identification and analysis of chemical substances of clinical and biological importance. Three class hours and four laboratory hours weekly.
Prerequisite: CH 203. CH 301, 302 highly recommended.

305 Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits; Spring) Survey of the representative and transition elements in the context of atomic and molecular structure. Introduces organometallic and solid-state principles as the foundation for understanding coordination theory and the biochemistry of inorganic cations. Laboratory work emphasizes the preparation, properties and characterization of selected inorganic and bioinorganic compounds that employ low and high temperature, vacuum and physicochemical techniques, with both aqueous and non-aqueous systems. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: CH 202, 203. CH 301, 302 highly recommended.

306 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4 credits; Spring) Advanced study of selected topics not covered in the introductory course: Hückel Molecular Orbital Theory; correlation of structure and activity by linear free energy relationships; acidity functions and Brønsted Catalysis Law; symmetry and stereochemistry; pericyclic, electrocyclic and sigmatropic reactions; kinetics and kinetic isotope effects; and application of spectroscopic techniques. Laboratory component involves individual multi-step syntheses and molecular modeling projects. Three class hours and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: CH 202, 203. CH 301, 302 highly recommended.

307 Polymers and Biopolymers (4 credits; Fall) A coherent introduction to modern polymer chemistry designed for students interested in chemistry, physics, engineering and biochemistry. Specifically, this course aims to broaden the perspective of students in the different technical areas to the point where they can appreciate the scope and importance of polymers, biopolymers and contemporary polymer technology. Emphasis is placed on the nature and synthesis of polymers; biological polymers and their reactions; thermodynamics and kinetics of polymerization; and physical characterization, fabrication, testing and uses of both natural and synthetic polymeric materials. Four class hours weekly. Prerequisites: CH 201, 202.

333 Statistical Thermodynamics (4 credits; Fall; co-listed as PH 333) The principles of thermodynamics are investigated from a modern statistical point of view based upon ensemble theory. This includes Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, transport phenomena, thermal interactions, kinetic theory and applications to a variety of molecular systems. Prerequisites: CH 102, PH 212, MA 202, CH 301 and 302; or permission of the Chair if taken concurrently with CH 302.

345 Special Topics in Chemistry. Topics vary according to the needs and interests of students and faculty. Possibilities may include medicinal chemistry, practical spectroscopy and the history of chemistry.

351 Quantum Chemistry and Chemical Physics (2 credits; Spring; co-listed as PH 351) The foundations of quantum chemistry and its applications to chemical systems are explored. The Schrodinger wave equation, the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom and matrix mechanics are examined. Special emphasis is placed on group theory and application to spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CH 102, PH 202 or 212, MA 202, CH 301 and 302; or permission of the Chair if taken concurrently with CH 302. MA 452 (previously #352) recommended.

370 Career Internship in Chemistry (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Part-time placement designed to test the business aspects of the chemical profession in a work setting and to bring practical knowledge of a functioning chemical or pharmaceutical business to the classroom. Prerequisites: BA 340, 360, 380, senior standing in Chemistry and permission of the Department Chair.

389 Independent Study (4 credits; Fall, Spring) Independent, faculty-supervised laboratory research project is conducted at on- or off- campus facilities and summarized in a paper of appropriate length, style and format. Not usually acceptable as an elective in place of a 300-level course, or as a substitute for chemical research. Prerequisites: Approval of the Department and a written proposal. At least four courses in Chemistry and permission of the Department Chair.

391 Faculty Sponsored Research (2 credits; Fall) Provides an opportunity to train in the acquisition of new knowledge in a selected modern research area in chemistry under the supervision of one or more faculty members on campus or in off campus research facilities. Requires a minimum of 8 hours a week in a laboratory training in empirical or computer simulation methods. Prerequisite: senior status or permission of the instructor.

392 Faculty Sponsored Research (2 credits; Spring) A continuation of CH391. The student is expected to put into practice the research techniques learned during the training period in CH391. The aim of the work is to achieve publishable results, though a peer reviewed publication is not necessary to pass the course, nor its absence affect the grade a student receives. Prerequisite: CH391.

490 Chemistry Capstone (2+2 credits ; Fall and Spring) Two-semester Capstone course that involves career guidance activities; the completion of a faculty-supervised laboratory investigation, with those results delivered in an oral presentation, a written thesis and poster format; successful achievement on a diagnostic exam used to evaluate comprehensive undergraduate Chemistry knowledge; senior standing in Chemistry with a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the major. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Physics Courses (PH)

201 Fundamental Concepts of Physics I (4 credits; Fall) Introduction to the principles of mechanics, heat and sound. Presents historical development, methodology and philosophy of our current understanding of the physical universe from an experimental point of view. Includes laboratory experience, demonstrations, lectures and discussions. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly.

202 Fundamental Concepts of Physics II (4 credits; Spring) Continuation of PH 201. Introduces the principles of light, electricity, magnetism. Includes laboratory experience, demonstrations, lectures and discussions. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: PH 201.

211 Conceptual Physics I (4 credits; Fall) Calculus-based introduction to the principles of mechanics, heat and thermodynamics through laboratory experience, demonstrations, lectures and discussions. Primarily for well-prepared science and engineering majors. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: MA 202.

212 Conceptual Physics II (4 credits; Spring) Continuation of PH 211. Examines waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism and elementary electrodynamics. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: PH 211, MA 202.

223 Essentials of Physical Geology (4 credits; Spring) Basic concepts of physical geology with an emphasis on the dynamic nature of the earth and the land-forming processes and cycles, which are constantly altering our environment. The laboratory demonstrates these processes and illustrates the principles developed in lectures. Primarily intended for non-science majors including those preparing for the teaching profession. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Evening students may enroll in only the lecture portion of the course for three credits. Prerequisites: Satisfactory performance on the mathematics placement inventory or satisfactory completion of MA 100 is required.

224 Frontiers in Astronomy (4 credits; Fall) Overview of the fundamentals, history and frontiers of astronomy. Introduces the planets, exobiology, structure and dynamics of stars, galaxies, the universe and cosmology. Includes lectures, demonstrations, observations and discussions. Three class hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Evening students may enroll in only the lecture portion of the course for three credits.

324 Quantum Physics (4 credits; Fall) This examination of the basic principles of atomic and nuclear physics demonstrations, lectures and discussions. Prerequisites: MA 202 and either PH 201, 202 or 211, 212.

325 Advanced Engineering Mathematics I (4 credits) Not regulary scheduled. Prerequisites: MA 203, MA 351, PH 212

326 Advanced Engineering Mathematics II (4 credits) Not regulary scheduled. Prerequisite: MA 325

331 Engineering Mechanics (4 credits; Fall) Examination of the principles of mechanics with engineering applications. Includes vector treatment of forces, statics, centroids, moments of inertia, friction, kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Prerequisite: PH 211.

333 Statistical Thermodynamics (4 credits; Fall; co-listed as CH333) The principles of thermodynamics are investigated from a modern statistical point of view based upon ensemble theory in this course. This includes Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, transport phenomena, thermal interactions, kinetic theory and applications to a variety of molecular systems. Offered in odd years. Prerequisites: CH 102, PH 212, MA 202, CH 301 and 302; or permission of the Chair if taken concurrently with CH 302.

341 Electronic Circuit Analysis I (4 credits) Not regulary scheduled.

342 Electronic Circuit Analysis II (4 credits) Not regulary scheduled.

345 21st Century Physics (4 credits; Spring) An intensive study in the seminar/laboratory style of selected topics of current interest in physics. Topics include but are not limited to areas in relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum electrodynamics, quantum field theories, high energy physics, elementary particle physics, cosmology, astrophysics, solid state physics and mathematical physics. May be taken several times by any student but must be on different topics each time. Prerequisites: PH 211, 212, 324, MA 201, 202. Interview with and permission by the instructor and Department Chair. Other prerequisites according to the topic.

351 Quantum Chemistry and Chemical Physics (2 credits; Spring) Co-listed as CH 351

389 Physics Research (4 credits) Individualized study tailored to suit the needs or interests of qualified juniors and seniors. Each student works under the guidance of a faculty adviser approved by the Department Chair. Suggested topics include quantum mechanics; nuclear, atomic and chemical physics; electrodynamics; advanced optics; mathematical physics; astrophysics; participation in ongoing research projects with faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the Chair.

391 Faculty Sponsored Research (2 credits; Fall) Provides an opportunity to train in the acquisition of new knowledge in a selected modern research area in physics under the supervision of one or more faculty members on campus or in off campus research facilities. Requires a minimum of 8 hours a week in a laboratory training in empirical or computer simulation methods. Prerequisite: senior status or permission of the instructor.

392 Faculty Sponsored Research (2 credits; Spring) A continuation of PH391. The student is expected to put into practice the research techniques learned during the training period in PH391. The aim of the work is to generate publishable results, though a peer review publication is not necessary to pass the course, nor its absence affect the grade a student receives in the two courses. Prerequisite: PH391.

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