Educational Leadership Courses

ED 502 Foundations of Curriculum
(3 credits; Fall, Spring, Summer) This course examines a variety of curriculum issues facing educators today. Through individual research and group process, students develop an understanding of historical perspectives of curriculum as well as curriculum design, which includes curriculum delivery, instruction and assessment. State and federal standards, policies and mandates are examined as well as how data analysis and data-driven decision making impact curriculum.

ED 600 Practicum: Supervisory Certification
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course requires a student to complete a minimum of 90 hours as a supervisory intern in an elementary school, secondary school and on a district level supervised by a school administrator possessing the same supervisory certification the student is pursuing. The student completes and presents a leadership portfolio to the practicum facilitator at the conclusion of the practicum. The leadership portfolio includes an hourly log and documentation of leadership competencies that total 360 hours as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A minimum of 90 hours is completed and documented during the practicum semester, and the remaining hours are completed during fieldwork that relates to the supervisory competencies distributed to students at the beginning of their leadership programs. Students are required to participate in on-campus seminars during the semester. Credit is given for certification only; not applicable to a degree. Prerequisite: Completion of all required coursework. 

ED 633 School Law
(3 credits; Fall, Summer) From school speech to school district liability, this course explores the intricacies of school law.  Education cases from the Supreme Court dealing with subjects as diverse as violence against women and mandatory student fees are viewed through the prism of the history of school law and analyzed with a focus on the future directions of school law. Statutory analysis and ways to avoid litigation are the twin pillars of the class. To paraphrase the famous language of the Tinker decision, “Students, teachers and administrators do not abandon their rights upon entering the schoolhouse gate; however, unless they are careful, school law might make them feel that way!” Special education, the source of much potential litigation in schools today, also is examined.

ED 634 Managing Organizations and Change
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course provides students with the resources, experiences and knowledge that will equip them to begin to understand the principles, theories and realities of managing educational organizations and effectively leading an educational organization through change.  Strategic planning, developing a vision and mission, and promoting continuous and sustained school improvement are highlighted in this course. Strategies for employing data-driven decision making and monitoring and evaluating school progress also are included. The course also covers the study of organizational charts as well as management and operational systems within a school and school district.  

ED 635 Supervision Principles and Theories
(3 credits: Fall, Spring)
This course examines the components of educational leadership that relate to the supervisory process. Both theory and practice are emphasized. The clinical supervision process is highlighted along with a variety of different “walk-through” models of supervision.  Diagnosing teacher needs, instructional improvement plans and identification of supervisory behaviors also are discussed. An emphasis on interpersonal skills, organizational skills and the knowledge base needed to be an effective school administrator is an integral part of the course.

ED 636 Advanced Seminar in Supervision
(3 credits; Spring) The purpose of this course is to refine and expand the student's understanding of educational leadership as it relates to a broad scope of the supervisory process. The course includes practical skills that contribute to effective instructional leadership and supervision.  Problem-solving models, planning and assessment models and professional development models are highlighted in the course. The components of “action research” in a school setting are presented and analyzed.

ED 637 Instructional Leadership
(3 credits; Fall, Summer) This course provides students with the opportunity to explore current trends in educational leadership—blending practical advice and research. This course is based on the premise that proficiency in school leadership and management results from a combination of self-knowledge and situational or contextual knowledge. Case studies are used to enhance analytical skills and to develop problem-solving abilities that are necessary for school administrators to be effective in their jobs. State and national standards for school administrators are highlighted as well as the research-based responsibilities of school leaders.

ED 638 School Finance
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course examines the school business office roles and functions and how they impact the fiscal management, instructional and non-instructional programs and services of schools and school districts. The course includes a study of revenues, expenses, local taxation, tax bases, and federal and state formulas, subsidies and equity issues surrounding the school budgeting process. The construction of district and school budgets is covered as well as how enrollment projections, physical facilities, accounting, payroll, insurance and liabilities impact the budget. The process for preliminary and final budget adoption by school boards also is highlighted.

ED 639 Practicum: Principalship
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course requires a student to complete a minimum of 90 hours as a K-12 principal intern in an elementary school or secondary school supervised by a certified school principal. The student completes and presents a leadership portfolio to the practicum facilitator at the conclusion of the practicum. The leadership portfolio includes an hourly log and documentation of leadership competencies that total 360 hours as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A minimum of 90 hours is completed and documented during the practicum semester, and the remaining hours are completed during fieldwork that relates to the K-12 principal competencies distributed to students at the beginning of the leadership program.  Students also are required to participate in on-campus seminars during the semester. Credit is given for certification only; not applicable to a degree. Prerequisite: Completion of all required coursework.

ED 640 Organization and Administration of Pupil Personnel Services
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course prepares qualified and appropriately certified graduate students for district-wide responsibilities related to the coordination of the various functions included in pupil personnel services. Emphasis is placed on the management and supervision of school counseling, attendance, child accounting, health services, school psychology and social work within a school district. The responsibilities of the supervisor of pupil personnel services for coordinating all services provided to students within a school district are outlined and studied.  Program and staff development functions as well as curricular and administrative duties of the supervisor of pupil personnel services are highlighted. Policies and procedures related to the delivery of pupil services as related to community, state, federal and local social agencies are examined.

ED 642 Program Evaluation
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course examines the program evaluation cycle, including the process of planning educational programs, monitoring and evaluating how well those program are working with regard to designated outcomes, and making decisions with respect to continuation, revision or termination of these programs based on empirical evidence. In addition, this course highlights the leadership skills necessary to utilize the program evaluation cycle in order to improve teaching and learning. It also addresses how program evaluation assists schools and districts in meeting local, state and national accountability standards.

ED 645 Negotiations and Dispute Resolution
(3 credits; Fall, Summer) This course examines the impact that labor relations and negotiations have on the leadership responsibilities of the principal and superintendent  Special emphasis is placed on the selection of staff, examination of employee rights, negotiation strategies, salary cost analysis, mediation, the grievance and arbitration process, and the benefits of building positive relationships among all members of the school community.

ED 649 Practicum: Superintendent's Letter of Eligibility
(3 credits; Fall, Spring) This course requires a student to complete a minimum of 90 hours as a superintendent intern on a district level supervised by a certified school superintendent. The student completes and presents a leadership portfolio to the practicum facilitator at the conclusion of the practicum. The leadership portfolio includes an hourly log and documentation of leadership competencies that total 180 hours as required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A minimum of 90 hours is completed and documented during the practicum semester, and the remaining hours are completed during fieldwork that relates to the superintendent competencies distributed to students at the beginning of the leadership program. Students are required to participate in on-campus seminars during the semester. Credit is given for certification only; not applicable to a degree. Prerequisite: Completion of all required coursework.

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