Stackhouse Scott

Dr. Scott Stackhouse

Associate Professor of Physical Therapy (CV)
stackhos@arcadia.edu

Scott K. Stackhouse, PT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, received a Bachelor’s degree in biology and psychology from Franklin & Marshall College, a Master of Science degree in physical therapy from Arcadia University, and a Ph.D. in Biomechanics and Movement Science from the University of Delaware. In his post-doctoral studies at Drexel University, he examined mechanisms associated with neurological injury, neuroplasticity and neuroregeneration. Dr. Stackhouse continues to collaborate with colleagues in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at Drexel University College of Medicine as a co-investigator on a project funded by the Paralyzed Veterans of America Spinal Cord Research Foundation. 

He has published peer-reviewed publications and given scientific or invited presentations related to this research. Dr. Stackhouse and Dr. Phil McClure collaborate on projects associated with pain and shoulder function. Scott is also interested in improving the quality of movement in persons with neuromuscular disorders through strength training (including the use of electrical stimulation) and task-oriented practice. He and collaborators at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, with funding from the Foundation for Physical Therapy, are conducting a clinically-based study examining the effects of strength training and motor learning therapies on improving gait function and participation in adolescents with cerebral palsy. Scott has also practiced as a physical therapist in a variety of settings addressing patient issues across the lifespan. 

Dr. Stackhouse is on the research subcommittee and a research task force for the neurology Section of the APTA and the finance committee for the Section on Research, APTA.

Recent Publications and Presentations

  • Stackhouse, S.K., Tate A, Carlin M, Fitzsimmons E, Meisenhelter A, Shaw H, Stuck E. (Feb. 2012). "Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Mechanical and Thermal Pain Processing Around The Healthy Achilles Tendon?"  Poster presentation at Combined Sections Meeting, APTA Orthopaedic Section, Chicago, IL.
  • Stackhouse, S.K., Tate A, Carlin M, Fitzsimmons E, Meisenhelter A, Shaw H, Stuck E. (Oct. 2011). "Do Physical Therapy Interventions Affect Mechanical and Thermal Pain Processing Around The Healthy Achilles Tendon?"  Presented at Pennsylvania Physical Therapy Association Annual Conference, Valley Forge, PA.
  • Stackhouse, S.K. (Feb. 2011).  "Experimental Pain Causes Infraspinatus Failure of Voluntary Activation during Isometric External Rotation."  Presented at  Combined Sections Meeting, APTA.
  • Krisa L., Frederick K.L., Canver J.C., Stackhouse S.K., Shumsky J.S, Murray M. (2011).  "Amphetamine Enhanced Motor Training Following Cervical Contusion Injury." Journal of Neurotrauma.
  • Stackhouse, S.K., Stapleton M.R., Wagner, D.A., McClure, P.W. (2010). "Voluntary Activation of the Infraspinatus Muscle in Nonfatigued and Fatigued States."  Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, 19:224-229.

Recent Support

Paralyzed Veterans of America, the Foundation for Physical Therapy, and the Section on Pediatrics of the APTA.

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