Coping with Grief and Loss

Grieving

What is Grief?

Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one – and this type of loss does often cause the most intense grief. But any loss can cause grief, including:

  • A relationship breakup
  • Loss of health
  • Losing a job
  • Loss of financial stability
  • A miscarriage
  • Death of a pet
  • Loss of a cherished dream
  • A loved one’s serious illness
  • Loss of a friendship
  • Loss of safety after a trauma

Myths and Facts About Grief

MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. 
Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it.

MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. 
Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you.

MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss.
Fact:
Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it.

MYTH: Grief should last about a year. 
Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person.

Source: Center for Grief and Healing  

The Five Stages of Grief:

  1. Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.”
  2. Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?”
  3. Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.”
  4. Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.”
  5. Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.”

*If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who is grieving goes through all of these stages – and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. Grief is a roller coaster, not a series of stages.

Source: American Hospice Foundation 

Common Symptoms of Grief

  • Shock and disbelief
  • Sadness
  • Guilt
  • Anger
  • Fear
  • Physical symptoms

Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support

  • Turn to friends and family members
  • Draw comfort from your faith
  • Join a support group
  • Talk to a therapist or grief counselor

Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself

  • Face your feelings
  • Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way
  • Look after your physical health
  • Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either
  • Plan ahead for grief “triggers”

Source: http://www.helpguide.org/mental/grief_loss.htm 

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